3 reasons to make grain bin safety the talk of your town

View of three grain bins against blue sky and puffy clouds

Zero lives lost: That’s the goal of Nationwide’s Grain Bin Safety Week program (Feb. 20-26) and Think Grain Bin Safety campaign. They reflect Nationwide’s passion for agriculture and leadership position as the nation’s number-one farm insurer.

Nationwide logo

With the Think Grain Bin Safety campaign and Grain Bin Safety Week program, we’re raising the bar for safety action and awareness this year. And CHS members and leaders can support the effort through financial contributions and community involvement.

“Grain bin safety is a lot more than just a campaign to us at Nationwide,” said Nationwide Agribusiness President Brad Liggett. “It’s something we’re passionate about year-round, and part of our commitment to the health, safety and success of our farm customers.”

Why grain bin safety outreach is so important

The ninth annual Grain Bin Safety Week program kicked off January 1 and runs through the end of April. It culminates with a contest in late April that awards nominated rural fire departments with grain rescue tubes and training.

Since 2007, there have been more than 475 documented grain bin entrapments in the U.S. Since its inception, the Grain Bin Safety Week program has awarded 207 rescue tubes in 31 states. The program has helped save five lives that would have been lost without the vital equipment and training.

While the distribution of rescue tubes is a key part of the program, Nationwide leads the effort to promote awareness to prevent grain bin entry and entrapments altogether.

3 reasons to lead grain bin safety efforts in your community

Grain Bin Safety Week and the Think Grain Bin Safety campaign depend on local community involvement. Beyond raising general awareness, there are three main reasons for CHS members to get involved:

  1. Avoid grain bin entry. Create a “zero lives lost” mentality by prioritizing safety whenever working in or around grain bins or preventing bin entry whenever possible.
  2. Become a grain bin safety advocate. Share critical grain bin safety information with friends, family and community members.
  3. Prepare first responders. Nominate your local fire department to receive a grain rescue tube and necessary training as part of the Grain Bin Safety Week contest.

“We don’t want to just talk about grain bin safety. We want to raise awareness about how to save lives and equip our rural communities with the tools and training they need to make it happen,” Liggett said. “Grain bin safety is so important to us at Nationwide because we recognize the extreme hazards of working in grain bins. And we want to ensure our customers and all farmers are safe and return home at the end of every day working on the farm.”

How to get started

Start raising grain bin safety awareness in your community at Thinkgrainbinsafety.com. There, you’ll find articles, videos and other tools and resources to start the conversation with customers, other farmers and members of your community.

Safety contest helps defend against grain bin deaths in rural America

View of sunset between two large grain bins

Grain Bin Safety Week is Feb. 20 – 26, 2022; Since 2014, Nationwide has supplied 207 grain rescue tubes and training to fire departments across 31 states.

For rural Americans, seeing grain bins dot the landscape is often an everyday occurrence. However, these storage structures pose very serious and threatening dangers to agriculture workers if proper health and safety procedures aren’t followed. In just 20 seconds, a farmer can sink in the quicksand-like flow of grain and become fully entrapped with little hope for survival. Such accidents have resulted in 81 deaths over the past five years.

Nationwide logo

To bring attention to the dangers and prevent these tragic accidents, the leading insurer of farms and ranches in the U.S., Nationwide, has opened its ninth annual Nominate Your Fire Department Contest in recognition of Grain Bin Safety Week. CHS is a supporting partner of Grain Bin Safety Week.

The annual advocacy campaign aims to deliver critical education and resources to agricultural professionals while also supplying life-saving rescue equipment and training to rural fire departments, who are often the first and only line of defense when an entrapment occurs. Nominations for this year’s Nominate Your Fire Department Contest are open until April 30.

”Nationwide has been deeply rooted in agriculture since the company’s founding by the Ohio Farm Bureau and our commitment to protecting America’s producers continues to fuel our work today,” said Brad Liggett, president of Agribusiness at Nationwide. “Grain Bin Safety Week is one of many efforts in place to help address the dangers they face. These accidents send shockwaves through rural communities each year, and the reality is, they are often preventable. We are proud to continue to grow Grain Bin Safety Week and bring on new partners in our mission to end this industry issue.”

This year, Grain Bin Safety Week runs from Feb. 20 – 26 and has been officially recognized by the following states: Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Missouri, New York, North Dakota, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.

Since initiating its Grain Bin Safety advocacy campaign in 2014, Nationwide has supplied grain rescue tubes and training to 207 fire departments in 31 states. At least five successful rescues have taken place using the resources provided through the program, including a recent July 2021 rescue in northwest Kansas.

Injuries & Fatalities: The Startling Facts

  • Suffocation from engulfment or oxygen-deficient atmospheres is the leading cause of death in grain accidents.
  • In four seconds, an adult can sink knee-deep in flowing grain and be rendered unable to free themselves without help.
  • More than 150 grain entrapments have been recorded in the past five years. It’s estimated an additional 30% of cases go unreported.
  • In 2020, there were 35 grain entrapment cases resulting in 20 fatalities.

Sources: 2020 Summary of U.S. Agricultural Confined Space-Related Injuries and Fatalities and United Press International

To help prevent further deaths and injuries, Nationwide collaborates each year with the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety (NECAS) to provide safety training. NECAS instructors travel to training locations with state-of-the-art grain entrapment simulators and rescue tubes. The comprehensive training sessions include classroom education and rescue simulations using the entrapment tools, which are loaded onto 20-foot trailers and able to hold about 100 bushels of grain each.

“NECAS is proud to partner with Nationwide on its Grain Bin Safety advocacy initiative to share resources and education with farmers about the hazards of entering grain bins and employing a zero-entry mentality whenever possible,” said Dan Neenan, director at NECAS. “It’s also critically important to continue the hard work in getting rural fire departments the equipment and training they need to respond quickly in an entrapment scenario.”

For more information about the program, purpose or nomination process, visit www.grainbinsafetyweek.com or watch this video.

Special Alert- General Manager Updates on COVID-19

As you are aware, the impact of the global pandemic caused by COVID-19 continues to rapidly evolve. Safety is a core value for CHS Northern Plains and includes a focus on the health and wellbeing of our employees, families, customers and owners, and the communities in which we live and work.

We understand that spring is here, and I want to emphasize; we are open for business. We are simply adjusting some protocols. CHS Northern Plains has implemented the following changes effective Thursday, March 19th, until further notice: 

  • We are limiting access at all locations. We respectfully ask you to contact us through phone or email whenever possible. Some of our locations have enacted split shift schedules; staff that can work remotely, have been asked to do so and will be available via phone or e-mail.
  • If you need a grain check, please contact us and we will mail it promptly, deliver it to local bank for deposit or setup a pickup location outside of the office. 
  • All visitors to our office will be required to complete a questionnaire before entering our facilities. We are also asking all staff and visitors to adhere to the 6-foot distance recommended by the CDC to reduce virus spread.
  • For in-home propane leak checks, inspections or service; customers will be asked to complete a simple screening questionnaire prior to any CHS employee providing in-home service work.    
  • We have restricted face-to-face meetings. Our sales staff will conduct business via phone, text or email. As a company that prides itself on the relationships we have built, this will be a difficult change. However, face-to-face meetings pose a greater risk for everyone involved. If you need to conduct critical business that requires an in-person meeting, please call for an appointment to confirm access to the facility and availability of staff.
  • We ask you to call ahead for product pickup whenever possible, our team will ensure that everything is ready to load upon your arrival.
  •  For those customers or vendors delivering grain or picking up products, we ask that you limit your time in the office to essential business. At some locations, we are asking drivers to remain in their cab. Please check our location policies or watch for information and direction upon arrival.

We will adjust our practices as necessary in the coming days, weeks or months. Rest assured, it is our commitment that we will continue to provide excellent service and support throughout this unprecedented time, even if we must do it differently. We value your business, your trust in CHS Northern Plains and appreciate your understanding during this time. We look forward to resuming normal interactions as soon as it is deemed safe to do so.

Todd Oster
General Manager
CHS Northern Plains

NORTH DAKOTA IN-CROP DICAMBA USE EXTENDED UNTIL JULY 10

June 26, 2019
BISMARCK – The North Dakota Department of Agriculture (NDDA) announced today it will extend the application date for the in-crop use of Dicamba on soybeans for the 2019 growing season. The new deadline is July 10 or beginning bloom (R1 growth phase), whichever comes first. In January, NDDA had approved a 24c Special Local Needs (SLN) label for the in-crop use of Dicamba on soybeans only until June 30.
“Due to persistent rain events, lack of suitable days for spraying and the delayed growth of soybeans, the last date for applications has been extended to July 10,” Agriculture Commissioner Doug Goehring said. “The beginning bloom (R1 growth phase) restriction is still applicable and product may not be applied if soybeans have reached this phase.”
All provisions of the federal label still apply.

Local high school seniors awarded CHS Northern Plains scholarships

Five high school seniors from the CHS Northern Plains trade area have been named recipients of $1000 scholarships.
 
“CHS Northern Plains is committed to strengthening our future leaders and ensuring a strong future for our youth,” said Todd Oster, general manager. “Since the scholarship program started, it’s been an honor and a privilege to make an impact in the endeavors of our youth right here in our local communities. Congratulations to this year’s recipients.”
 
 
The recipients of the 2019 CHS Northern Plains scholarships include:

Cole Baumiller, Hazelton, ND, son of Scott & Corrine Baumiller
Tanner Kempf, Ashley, ND, son of John & Michelle Kempf
Alex Vander Vorste, Pollock, SD, son of Loren & Andrea Vander Vorste
Autumn Wieseler, Gettysburg, SD, daughter of Ben Wieseler and Deb and Justin Cronin
Lauren Wittler, Onida, SD, daughter of Matt & Sherise Wittler
 
In order to be eligible for a CHS Northern Plains scholarship, applicants must be a high school senior from the CHS Northern Plains trade area. A parent or guardian must be a customer of CHS Northern Plains. We encourage but do not require the individual to be seeking a degree or certification in agricultural studies.  Full details can be found on our website, chsnorthernplains.com.
 
The local CHS Northern Plains retail businesses deliver agronomy, energy, feed and grain products and services to North and South Dakota ag producers and other customers from eight locations, as part of CHS Inc., a leading global agribusiness owned by farmers, ranchers and cooperatives across the United States. Diversified in energy, agronomy, grains and foods, CHS is committed to helping its customers, farmer-owners and other stakeholders grow their businesses through its domestic and global operations. CHS supplies energy, crop nutrients, grain marketing services, animal feed, food and food ingredients along with financial and risk management services. The company operates petroleum refineries/pipelines and manufactures, markets and distributes Cenex® brand refined fuels, lubricants, propane and renewable energy products.

Area producers share in local CHS patronage distribution

Area producers share in local CHS patronage distribution

GETTYSBURG, SOUTH DAKOTA, April 17, 2019 – Eligible farmer-owners of CHS Northern Plains, based out of Gettysburg, South Dakota, shared in the recent distribution of cash patronage and equity based on business done with CHS.

“We’re extremely proud to share this important cooperative membership benefit with our customers,” said Todd Oster, general manager. “Delivering an economic return to them on the business they do with CHS is one more way we help our owners grow.”

This locally based retail division of CHS Inc. allocated a total of $6,257,066.98 in patronage dividends to its eligible members based on business done Sept. 1, 2017 – Aug. 31, 2018, of which $1,105,623.76 is being paid out in cash.

Overall, CHS Inc. will return $150 million in cash patronage and equity redemption to its farmer-owners in 2019, part of the cooperative’s commitment to sharing profits with owners and returning money to rural America where it can be reinvested in the community. More than 840 local cooperatives and 25,000 farmers share in this distribution of cash patronage and equity redemptions.

The percentage returned to owners is determined annually by the CHS Board of Directors.

“Returning cash to our owners enables farmers, ranchers and cooperatives to invest in their own futures,” said Dan Schurr, chairman of the CHS Board.

In the past 12 years, CHS has returned about $3.5 billion to its owners in the form of cash patronage.

The Gettysburg-based retail business delivers agronomy, energy, grain and feed products and services to South and North Dakota ag producers and other customers from 10 locations. It is part of CHS Inc., a leading global agribusiness owned by farmers, ranchers and cooperatives across the United States. Diversified in energy, agronomy, grains and foods, CHS is committed to helping its customers, farmer-owners and other stakeholders grow their businesses through its domestic and global operations. CHS supplies energy, crop nutrients, grain marketing services, animal feed, food and food ingredients along with financial and risk management services. The company operates petroleum refineries/pipelines and manufactures, markets and distributes Cenex® brand refined fuels, lubricants, propane and renewable energy products.

This document and other CHS Inc. publicly available documents contain, and CHS officers and representatives may from time to time make, “forward–looking statements” within the meaning of the safe harbor provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Report Act of 1995. Forward–looking statements can be identified by words such as “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “seek,” “believe,” “project,” “estimate,” “expect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “will” and similar references to future periods. Forward–looking statements are neither historical facts nor assurances of future performance. Instead, they are based only on CHS current beliefs, expectations and assumptions regarding the future of its businesses, future plans and strategies, projections, anticipated events and trends, the economy and other future conditions. Because forward–looking statements relate to the future, they are subject to inherent uncertainties, risks and changes in circumstances that are difficult to predict and many of which are outside of CHS control. CHS actual results and financial condition may differ materially from those indicated in the forward–looking statements. Therefore, you should not rely on any of these forward–looking statements. Important factors that could cause CHS actual results and financial condition to differ materially from those indicated in the forward–looking statements are discussed or identified in CHS public filings made with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including in the “Risk Factors” discussion in Item 1A of CHS Annual Report on Form 10–K for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2018. Any forward–looking statements made by CHS in this document are based only on information currently available to CHS and speak only as of the date on which the statement is made. CHS undertakes no obligation to publicly update any forward–looking statement, whether written or oral, that may be made from time to time, whether as a result of new information, future developments or otherwise.

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CHS Foundation Announces $1.5 Million Gift to Support SDSU Precision Agriculture Program

 

Photo from left to right: CAFES Dean John Killefer, CHS Board of Director Tracy Jones, CHS Board of Director Randy Knecht, CHS Foundation President Nanci Lilja, SDSU President Barry Dunn, Jerome J. Lohr College of Engineering Dean Bruce Berdanier, CHS Board of Director Dave Kayser, and CHS Region Vice President Ed Mallett.

 

The CHS Foundation, funded by charitable gifts from CHS Inc., announced a $1.5 million grant to support the South Dakota State University (SDSU) precision agriculture program and construction of the new Raven Precision Agriculture Center on campus.

“The gift from the CHS Foundation is pivotal in allowing us to make our globally preeminent precision agriculture program a reality,” says John Killefer, the South Dakota Corn Utilization Council Endowed Dean of the SDSU College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences.

The gift aligns with CHS priorities around ensuring that educating the next generation of ag leadership includes technology and tradition.

“The CHS Foundation is committed to supporting projects that cultivate opportunity for students interested in the agriculture industry,” says Nanci Lilja, president, CHS Foundation.  “By supporting the precision ag program at SDSU, there will be more qualified graduates entering the agriculture industry.”

SDSU is the nation’s first land-grant university to offer a bachelor’s degree and minor in precision agriculture. The degree is a collaborative effort encompassing the Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering Department and the Agronomy, Horticulture and Plant Science Department in the College of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Sciences, as well as the Jerome J. Lohr College of Engineering.

SDSU’s precision agriculture degree will provide students with access to cutting-edge developments in the rapidly evolving intersection of agronomics, high-speed sensor technology, data management and advanced machinery development. Students will be prepared for lifelong careers that support economically and environmentally sustainable agriculture.

This facility will allow the state to lead the nation in precision agriculture research, teaching and innovation.

“The gift in support of the Raven Precision Agriculture Center will positively impact our students and industry for decades to come,” says Killefer. “This commitment from the CHS Foundation illustrates the leadership role and vision they have within the agricultural industry.”

The building has 129,000 square feet of floor space that will be able to house modern precision farm equipment and will provide collaborative learning spaces for student design projects. Flexible space will give scientists from a variety of departments and industry space to collaborate on research and education.

“Precision agriculture technology is ever-changing,” says Lilja. “It’s exciting to envision the impact students will have by developing new technologies through collaboration with their peers and industry leaders in this new environment.”

Final construction plans are in-progress. Some ground work is expected to begin this fall, with construction starting in the spring of 2019.

About the CHS Foundation

The CHS Foundation, funded by charitable gifts from CHS Inc., is focused on developing a new generation of agriculture leaders for life-long success. Together, with our partners, we are igniting innovation and driving excellence in agriculture education, cultivating high-impact programs for rural youth and accelerating potential for careers in agriculture. Learn more at http://chsfoundation.org.

About South Dakota State University
Founded in 1881, South Dakota State University is the state’s Morrill Act land-grant institution as well as its largest, most comprehensive school of higher education. SDSU confers degrees from seven different colleges representing more than 200 majors, minors and specializations. The institution also offers 36 master’s degree programs, 15 Ph.D. and two professional programs.

The work of the university is carried out on a residential campus in Brookings, at sites in Sioux Falls, Pierre and Rapid City, and through Extension offices and Agricultural Experiment Station research sites across the state.

 

 
 

 

 

 

© 2022 CHS Inc.

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